DE HAVILLAND D.H.82A TIGER MOTH

DE HAVILLAND D.H.82A TIGER MOTH
in RAF dark green/dark earth/trainer yellow.
National markings (light blue) were painted above the RAF ones
gr TIGER MOTH (2)  gr TIGER MOTH (1)  gr TIGER MOTH (3)  gr TIGER MOTH (4)  FS35200
 
 
 

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7 Responses to “DE HAVILLAND D.H.82A TIGER MOTH”

  1. Φώτης Ζωγράφος Says:

    This model’s serials wouldn’t have been made, without of the creative help of our kind host Dimitris

  2. Φώτης Ζωγράφος Says:

    Many of them were also painted in dope aluminium. I believe that eventually all of them were painted in this colour. They were used as basic trainers untill 1955.
    Just mentioning that the first Tiger Moth in Greece, was used by the civilian company T.A.E. for basic training, in 1938.

  3. GEORGIADIS DIMITRIOS Says:

    A lot of thanks Fotis for sharing your precious knowledge.

  4. Miguel Says:

    All the details are very interesting, and the model looks great. But one question: I read, years ago, that the common practice with trainers, even military trainers, was to paint them in notorious colors. If that is right, why to maintain the camouflage in the upper surfaces?

  5. GEORGIADIS DIMITRIOS Says:

    Miguel: there’s a photo of two moths with camouflage in upper surfacew and a lighter tone for the undr surfaces. It is suggested that they nay have maintend the yellow trainer color. But may this is just a hypothesis!!!!!

  6. Φώτης Ζωγράφος Says:

    Miguel: During the WWII, the RAF used a Training Command Scheme, that was consisted of Dark Earth-Dark Green on the upper surfaces, and Trainer Yellow on the lower surfaces. In many cases the yellow was painted even on the lower half of the fuselage…
    Hellenic Air Force recieved some of its Tiger Moths and Harvards, painted in that scheme, which retained for a while….

  7. Miguel Says:

    Thank you for the answers.

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